We all know that men and women have different bodies, which means medical conditions exclusive to each sex, or so it seems. Stereotypical “women’s diseases” can actually be very dangerous for men.

Here are five diseases that we think of as being exclusive to women that are also applicable to men:

 

  • 1

    Breast Cancer

    Women have more breast tissue, and therefore are more likely to get breast cancer. However, men can definitely experience this disease. Even though only about one percent of all breast cancer affects men, this number is on the rise. This can be due to the lack of awareness in men, leading them to dismiss the warning signs.

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  • 2

    Depression

    Symptoms of depression in men and women can be very different. The stereotypical symptoms of depression include feeling sad and crying, which is contributed more to women. Men, however, may show anger or frustration. This may be why depression seems like more of a “women’s disease,” even though men suffer from it as well.

  • 3

    Eating Disorders

    While eating disorders overwhelmingly affect women, about 10 to 15 percent of people with eating disorders are male. Even though this may seem like a small amount, the effects are still devastating. Regardless of sex or gender, no one should have to suffer from an eating disorder.

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  • 4

    Thyroid Disease

    Even though women are 8 times more likely to have thyroid disease than men, they can still be affected. This happens when the thyroid either produces too much or doesn’t produce enough hormones. Men should watch out for the signs of thyroid disease just as closely as women.

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  • 5

    Bladder Infections

    Bladder infections are very common in women, but that doesn’t mean they’re not common in men, too. Men particularly at risk for bladder infections are those with an enlarged prostate, kidney stones, or narrowing or the urethra.

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