A friendly reminder: hanging your mask from your mirror in New Jersey is illegal.

Enter your number to get our free mobile app

We're all wearing masks everywhere we go, so naturally everyone seems to be storing theirs in their car. And I've seen this many times -- people are hanging their mask from their rear view mirror as either an easy place to keep it, so it hangs in the sun to kill germs (I don't know if that actually works or not), or just as a sign of the times.

Regardless of why your mask is dangling from your windshield for the world to see, it's a no-no in the Garden State.

We refer you to state statute section 39:3-74, "Windshields must be unobstructed and equipped with cleaners," which says the following:

No person shall drive any motor vehicle with any sign, poster, sticker or other non-transparent material upon the front windshield, wings, deflectors, side shields, corner lights adjoining windshield or front side windows of such vehicle other than a certificate or other article required to be so displayed by statute or by regulations of the commissioner.

 

No person shall drive any vehicle so constructed, equipped or loaded as to unduly interfere with the driver's vision to the front and to the sides.

In other words, anything that blocks your view in your vehicle is illegal.

And it's not just masks -- anything hanging from your mirror would be considered illegal, like air fresheners, fuzzy dice, etc.

I'm not a lawyer and I could be wrong, but we're assuming if you got a ticket for this it would be for having an obstructed windshield and it would cost you $54.

And given how warm and fuzzy the state has been lately with the signs on the Parkway, perhaps it's best to just set it on the seat next to you.

Speeding sign on the Garden State Parkway - Photo: Chris Coleman

According to the Asbury Park Press, around 80,000 people received windshield obstruction tickets in New Jersey in 2017. So yes, people do get stopped for it.

And don't fret -- this isn't just a New Jersey thing where it seems like everything is illegal or banned. Our radio friends in Illinois reminded their listeners of the laws out there and the same holds true in Pennsylvania, too.

Enter your number to get our free mobile app