It all started with MySpace. Remember those surveys we all used to fill out that used to turn into viral comments that included random facts about ourselves?

Well, those viral comments that everyone would copy and paste on MySpace gradually made their way to Facebook just as the rest of the world switched platforms. However, they weren't questions in the comments anymore. The surveys turned into memes that everyone shared and left the answers to the questions in an individual post.

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You know the ones: the pictures that ask you your name, age, where you're from, what's your favorite color, favorite food, etc.

They're always so fun to fill out because let's be honest, who doesn't enjoy talking about themselves? On a not-so-vain note, with the rise of social marketing, people often use these viral surveys as engagement posts and encourage people to pass them on. Here's the problem with that: you're giving the bad internet people even more ammunition they can attempt to use to hack your personal accounts.

The Sarasota Police Department shared a meme to their Facebook page that explains exactly why you shouldn't be filling ANY of those surveys out, let alone sharing them with the entire Facebook platform. If you don't want anyone to have access to your password, stop giving them clues! You may feel like that's silly, but they're not wrong.

Even if your password itself doesn't contain any of that information, chances are your security questions do. So, why would you share that private information with the largest online social platform in the world? What's done is done. When you see a survey/info-requesting meme circulating again, try to resist the urge to participate.

Source: Facebook

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