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It is not something we often think about unless we have a problem, but good vision is a true gift. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends regular eye exams according to your family history and doctor's recommendations. If you are over the age of 65 you should see an eye doctor every one to two years. 

According to the Vision Council of America, about 75% of adults use some type of vision correction, whether that be glasses or contact lenses, but there is a lot more we can do to maintain the health of our eyesight. From the foods we eat to our daily habits, we’ve got three healthy vision basics

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    1

    Up Your Vitamin A Intake

    Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in many foods. It is an essential vitamin when it comes to keeping normal vision. It can be found in many foods like eggs, skim milk, and many yellow and orange fruits and vegetables, just like carrots. So when your mom used to tell you that carrots were good for your eyes, she was right, as usual. Add some more vitamin A into your diet to help maintain your normal vision.

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    2

    Wear Sunglasses

    The harmful rays of ultraviolet radiation from the sun can damage your eyesight. Just like sunscreen protects your skin, sunglasses protect your eyes. By wearing sunglasses, you can protect your eyes from those UV rays and reduce your chance of cataracts that then lead to loss of vision. Not all sunglasses offer the same amount of protection. When buying sunglasses look for ones labeled 99%-100% UV protection to ensure you are actually blocking those rays, 

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    3

    Limit Your Screen Time

    We all do it. We look at our phone or tablet, sit in front of a computer, or watch TV for hours at a time. All those screens can put a strain on your vision. It is recommended that you give your eyes a rest from the screens every 20 minutes.  Uses the 20-20-20 rule.  Look away at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds every 20 minutes to give your eyes some rest from all of the technology.