Working for Lite Rock 96.9 WFPG, I hear comments all the time about our nighttime host, Delilah. People want to know more about her and what she looks like, listeners tell stories about phone conversations they heard on her show, wonder how they can talk with Delilah and tell you how much they do or don't love listening to Delilah.

She is obviously an interesting woman who generates lots of attention.

The truth of the matter is that Delilah's off-the-air life story is just as interesting as anything you have heard on her show and really just an extension of what you hear on her show.

Let's start with Delilah's career.

Delilah's show airs daily from 7 pm to midnight on more than 200 radio stations in the U.S and Canada, including Lite Rock 96.9 WFPG. She's been doing versions of the Delilah show for 35 years, 25 years in national syndication.

Any given day, 55,000 people across the country try to call in to vent, ask advice or dedicate a song to someone they love; her shows are a dialogue between Delilah and the 80 to 100 who actually get through. After listening to callers pour out their problems, Delilah plays a song that matches their situation. It's estimated that over 8 million people will tune in during the course of a week.

How about Delilah's charity work?

There's a lot of it. Delilah established a foundation called Point Hope as a voice for forgotten children everywhere. The immediate focus of the Foundation is on refugee children in Ghana and on special needs children in the foster care system nationwide.  More recently, she signed on as a spokesperson for Together for Kids, a national alliance of children’s hospitals,  helping to raise money and awareness for Together for Kids member hospitals nationwide.

Then there is Delilah's personal life.

Delilah is a mother of 14 children, 11 of whom are adopted. Two of the children have died: a 16 year old child, Sammy, died in 2012, of complications of sickle-cell anemia which had gone untreated most of his life until he was adopted by Delilah and brought to the U.S. just 9 months before his death. In 2017, her 18-year old biological son Zachariah died by suicide, following a brief but intense period of depression.

Delilah has been married four times, and frequently jokes about, and refers to, her multiple divorces on her show. She recently celebrated her 8th wedding anniversary with Paul Warner.

No, she does not live in South Jersey. (That's another popular question I often hear about Delilah.) She lives with her large family on a 55-acre suburban Seattle farm, along with dogs, cats, pigs, cows, sheep, chickens, a zebra and three emus. A remodeled 1907 farmhouse on the property serves as her six-bedroom home.